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NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE (ナショナルジオグラフィック英語版)  発売日・バックナンバー

全149件中 121 〜 135 件を表示
1,034円
Feather Evolution
Who had them first, why did they spring up (hint: sex may have had a lot to do with it), and when did they take flight?

From Relics to Reefs
Fish can’t resist a sunken subway car, tank, or ship.

The Big Idea: Brain Trauma
Even small hits to the head can lead to brain deterioration. The NFL is seeking solutions.

Flashback: Feathers in Her Cap
In an image from 1926, Mae Vavrea tops off her turban with a Japanese bantam rooster.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

Opium Wars
A key step toward peace in Afghanistan is to wipe out poppies―one of the country’s most profitable crops.

Snub-Nosed Monkeys
Its quirky face may help China’s snub-nosed monkey cope in a brutal clime.

Editor's Note
In this issue, Robert Draper and David Guttenfelder cover Afghanistan's dangerous opium story.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.
1,034円
Phoenix Islands Rising
After a bleaching disaster, Pacific reefs bounce back.

Conquering a Cave
Explorers scramble to the end of Vietnam’s infinite cavern.

Noisy Ocean
The sounds of ships, from air guns to propellers, are on the increase, disrupting the lives of marine dwellers.

Flashback: The Big Dip
In an image from 1913, hundreds of thousands flock to a town in India to wash away their sins.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

Telltale Scribes
Timbuktu’s books and letters are historic, magical, romantic.

America’s Lost City
Cahokia was born with a bang and died of unknown causes.

Editor's Note
In this issue, we explore the natural history of population growth and the associated issues.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

GeoPuzzle: Throng Number
This month's puzzle explores the vastness of the world's population.
1,034円
Veiled Rebellion
Afghan women are starting to fight for a just life.

Heart of the Milky Way
The black hole at the galaxy’s center is giving up its secrets.

Bat Crash
A fungus has killed at least one million U.S. bats.

Gaudí's Masterpiece
The nature-inspired design of Antoni Gaudí's unfinished Sagrada Família remains ahead of its time.

Flashback: The Sound and the Furry
In 1946, a bat’s voice became visible with a microphone and a cathode-ray oscilloscope.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

Swan Serenade
The whooper swan is a bird to inspire flights of fancy.

Alaska's Choice
In Bristol Bay, the debate is on: gold mine versus salmon runs.

Protecting Predators
Dereck and Beverly Joubert have devoted their lives to the belief that big cats matter. Here's why.

Editor's Note
In this month’s issue, we wade into the fight between salmon and gold in Alaska's Bristol Bay.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.
1,034円
The Lost Herds Are Found
They survived Sudan’s civil war yet still need protection.

3 Degrees of Japan’s Seas
The waters host arctic crabs, temperate squid, tropical sharks.

The Big Idea: Little Packages
Designers are creating innovative, affordable products as solutions to problems all over the world.

Flashback: Modern Mermaids
For centuries, Japan's female free divers worked the country’s coasts without much clothing.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

Southern Sudan’s Shaky Peace
The scars and hopes of a boy named Logocho mirror his land.

Unburying the Aztec
Diggers find eagles, fur-wrapped knives, no emperor’s tomb.

Editor's Note
This month, the world of migrations comes to life in our magazine, on our channel, and online.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

GeoPuzzle: Odd-ysseys
This month, the amazing journeys of all sorts of animals provide inspiration for our puzzle.
1,034円
Forlorn in the Bayou
Louisiana’s wetlands are resilient and have bounced back before. But no one knows how long this recovery will take.

Time for a Sea Change
A new study suggests that our current appetite for seafood could soon lead to a worldwide fisheries collapse.

Being Jane Goodall
Her 50 years of work have made us rethink chimpanzees.

X-Ray Visions
In this month's photo journal, Nick Veasey gives us a glimpse inside the everyday world.

Editor's Note
This month's issue reminds us that there is more to the cost of oil than the ticking numbers at the fuel pump.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

GeoPuzzle: Wild Fish
This month's story about the growing strain on worldwide fisheries offers clues for the crossword puzzle.

My Blue Wilderness
Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle reflects on the disappearing blue wilderness of her childhood.

Australia’s Lost Giants
Jumbo kangaroos and flightless, ten-foot-tall birds once ruled Australia.

Under the Big Sky
William Albert Allard's photographs capture cagey cowhands and sprawling skies.

The Big Idea: Laser Preservation
Laser devices are making detailed images of famous landmarks around the world.

Flashback: Boing
These amazing leapers were photographed for a story on Australia in the December 1936 Geographic.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.


1,034円
Royal Incest
The ultimate taboo had risks―and rewards.

Madagascar’s Pierced Heart
Forces of greed are pillaging native rosewood, minerals, and gems.

Mystery Travelers
Eels writhe in rivers, cross oceans, and spawn in secret.

Editor's Note
Helicopter pilot Philippe Mathieu was instrumental in photographing Madagascar's terrain.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

GeoPuzzle: Sister Dearest
This month's story about the DNA of King Tut offers clues for the crossword puzzle.

Sands of Time
Aboriginal gods get the credit for Australia’s Fraser Island.

The Beauty of Insect Eggs
They’re colorful, crazy looking … and utterly practical.

The Big Idea: Augmented Reality
Smart phones and spectacles can add to what your eyes see.

Flashback: Deep Cover
Scarabs were among 263 insects photographed for the July 1929 Geographic.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

1,034円
The Iron Silk Road
A new Europe-to-Asia railway fuels trade―and tensions.

A Grassland Kingdom
India’s Kaziranga park shelters tigers, buffalo, and rhinos.

The Big Idea: Carbon Capture
Artificial trees” might suck planet-warming CO2 out of the air faster than real ones.

Flashback: Deep Cover
From 1934, a marine biologist prepares to shoot a rainbow-colored coral reef.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

Reviving Native Lands
U.S. tribes strive to undo years of environmental abuse.

Valley of the Whales
The origins of the marine mammal lie buried in Egyptian sand.?

Editor's Note
In the flooded limestone caves of the Bahamas, whirlpools can suck a diver down hundreds of feet.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

GeoPuzzle: Sea Legs
This month's story about ancient whales offers clues for the crossword puzzle.
1,034円
The Tale of a Tower
To woo a “Mary,” bowerbirds decorate with shells, cans, even pink paper clips.

A Sea of Dunes
Fish splash in lagoons, goats graze. And this magical Brazilian sandscape is no mirage.

The Big Idea: Clearing Space
It’s time to clean up the thousands of pieces of space debris.

Flashback: Don't Try This at Home
Electricity flashes from the thimble-topped fingers of a traveling “preacher-scientist."

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.

Pakistan’s Heart
The province of Punjab is prosperous, populous-and a Taliban target.

21st-Century Grid
Can we fix the infrastructure that powers our lives?

Editor's Note
Editor Chris Johns looks back to a life before electrification.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

GeoPuzzle: Gridspeak
This month's story about the electrical grid offers hints on the vocabulary of energy.
1,034円
Viking Weather
The warm clime that enticed Erik the Red is returning.

Mandela's Children
South Africa is still wrestling with the legacy of apartheid.

Caves of Faith
Near the Silk Road oasis of Dunhuang, ancient Buddhas draw tourists and scholars.

Editor's Note
Editor Chris Johns reflects on reconciliation in South Africa.

Desktop Wallpaper
Decorate your desktop with beautiful images from this month's issue of the magazine.

Your Shot
Submit your photo, check out Your Shot jigsaw puzzles, and see reader photos published in National Geographic.

Counting Cranes
How many whooping cranes are there? Not enough.

Foja Mountains
Biologists encounter an egg-laying mammal, a very weird moth, and other odd fauna.

The Big Idea: Safe Houses
A cheap fix could help the billions of people in earthquake zones.

Flashback: Midnight Fun
A series of suns studs Greenland's night sky.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.

Wide Angle
Read about and comment on new finds in science, technology, wildlife, and more.
1,034円
A Mountain Transformed
Thirty years after the blast, Mount St. Helens is reborn again.

Features

Shocking New Saints
They're adored by Mexican outlaws and ordinary folks.

The Secrets of Sleep
Scientists want to know why we do―and don’t―doze.

China's Tea Horse Road
Remnants of the legendary trail lead to modern thrills.

Europe's Wild Side
A team of photographers captures rebounding wildlife.

Lifeline for the Lynx
Spanish conservationists care for the world's rarest cat.

The Big Idea: Scanning Life
There's a new tool to study biodiversity: a DNA "bar code."

Editor's Note
Editor Chris Johns reflects on one man's search after the Mount St. Helens eruption.

Flashback: Deep Sleep
In October 1940―as German bombs rained on their city―Londoners sought overnight
safety in the Aldwych tube station.
1,034円
Water: Our Thirsty World

Freshwater Crisis
By 2050 a third of the people on Earth may lack a clean, secure source of water. Learn more about challenges and solutions.

Tibetan Plateau
Sometimes called the Third Pole, the region is a lockbox of snow and glacial ice that supplies fresh water to nearly a third of the world's people.

Parting the Waters
The Jordan River is now depleted by drought, pollution, and overuse. Could the fight to save it forge a path toward peace?

Get the Salt Out
There’s no shortage of water on the blue planet―just a shortage of fresh water. New desalination technologies may help.

Silent Streams
Freshwater animals are vanishing faster than those on land or at sea. But captive-breeding programs hold out hope.

The Last Drop
We may not get all the water we want. But we can have the water we need.

Behind the Photos
National Geographic photographers traveled around the world to report for this special water issue. Hear their stories and see their photos.

Visions of Earth
Each month, National Geographic features breathtaking photographs in Visions of Earth.
1,034円
Wolf Wars
Packs are back. Westerners are glad, scared, and howling mad.

Features

Peru's Puzzling Lines
Why did the Nasca etch giant birds and whales in the sand?

Killer Plants
They lure unsuspecting insects into death traps, then gorge on their flesh.

Changing Tribes
Books and guns are edging out the old ways in Ethiopia's Omo Valley.

Shanghai Reborn
The megacity tries to juggle its storied past and its plans for future glory.

Small-Town Nukes
A mini-reactor could offer cheap power to thousands of homes.

Editor's Note
Editor Chris Johns examines the complex relationship between humans and canines.

Flashback: Wolf Dancers
Participants in the Inupiat eagle-wolf dance honored slain animals, sending
their spirits home to ensure future hunting success.
1,034円
The Polygamists
A Mormon splinter group is neighborly―and notorious.

Features

One Cubic Foot
Guess how many creatures you’ll find in a cube of soil or sea.

Protecting Patagonia
Threats include shifting glaciers and salmon farms.

India’s Nomads
They hunt. They herd. They charm snakes. And they're in crisis.

Hubble Renewed
The telescope now sees more clearly than ever.

Curious Chimps
In the Congo they seem as intrigued by us as we are by them.

The Big Idea: Turning Mars into Earth
Can we change the frozen, thin-aired orb into a habitable planet?

Editor's Note
Photographer Stephanie Sinclair gives readers an exclusive look inside the FLDS.

Flashback: Family Portrait
In 1879 the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a ruling against polygamy.
1,034円
A Better Life With Bionics
The blind can see, a one-armed woman can fold her shirts. Learn how bionics are changing lives.

Features

Sublime Scottish Islands
Some call the Hebrides bleak. They’re not paying attention.

Restless Spirits
In China, ancient human sacrifice has given way to tomb-tending ceremonies, but the dead still make demands.

Asia’s Wildlife Trade
An exposé of the world's most notorious wildlife dealer, his special government friend, and his ambitious new plan.

Befriending Nemo
Clownfish captivate moviegoers, scientists―and anemones.

The Singapore Solution
The “minister mentor” wields a big carrot and a big stick.

Hitting Viruses Where They Live
A radical new strategy could outwit the wily, ever mutating parasites.

Editor's Note
Advances in bionics are helping people regain a sense of normalcy.

Flashback: Digging In
A man is fitted with a device to return to work after losing his arm in World War I.
1,034円
Searching for New Earths
Distant worlds are being discovered. Is one of them like ours?

Features

Mount Athos
High on their holy cliffs, monks are defiant, zealous, prayerful. Meanwhile, the outside world creeps closer.

The Hadza
Tanzania's hunter-gatherers live 10,000 years in the past.

The Other Tibet
For centuries, the Uygurs have lived in China's oil-rich far west. Now they are becoming strangers in their own land.

Resurrection Island
Once a scene of slaughter, South Georgia is now awash with life.

How Plants Mate
Let's not mince words: Pollen is plant sperm, and it's born to ride.

Carbon Bathtub
Draining excess CO2 from Earth's atmosphere will take a long time.

Editor's Note
Editor Chris Johns tells the story of an amateur photographer of uncommon courage.

Flashback: Big Bloom
A six-foot-tall flower attracted crowds at the New York Botanical Garden in 1937.
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